Work at Saltwater

About Observing

Job Openings

How to Apply

North Pacific Groundfish

Alaska Shellfish (Crab)

West Coast Groundfish

Links for Observers

Observer Forms

Have What It Takes?

Character Traits

•  Flexibility & Adaptability.
•  Maturity (common sense, tolerance, patience).
•  Ability to listen to and understand different viewpoints.
•  Good judgment - thinking before you act.
•  Tact and excellent communication skills.
•  Self confidence & self-reliance.
•  Resourcefulness and ability to adapt.
•  Physical and mental endurance.

 

General Requirements

•  Bachelor’s degree in one of the natural sciences.
•  Background check and/or Criminal Disclosure Statement.
•  Physical exam.
•  No direct financial interest in the fisheries.
•  Not prone to chronic or debilitating seasickness.
•  Physically able to carry out observer duties.
•  Successful completion of appropriate training course.
•  Meet program-specific requirements.

 

Preferred Qualifications

•  Previous experience as an observer.
•  Previous experience in scientific data collection and data entry beyond college.
•  Previous ocean experience aboard boats.
•  Valid and current passport.
 

Program-specific Requirements

For details on specific the job requirements click on the program’s  job description::

Have What It Takes?

Character Traits

•  Flexibility & Adaptability.
•  Maturity (common sense, tolerance, patience).
•  Ability to listen to and understand different viewpoints.
•  Good judgment - thinking before you act.
•  Tact and excellent communication skills.
•  Self confidence & self-reliance.
•  Resourcefulness and ability to adapt.
•  Physical and mental endurance.

 

General Requirements

•  Bachelor’s degree in one of the natural sciences.
•  Background check and/or Criminal Disclosure Statement.
•  Physical exam.
•  No direct financial interest in the fisheries.
•  Not prone to chronic or debilitating seasickness.
•  Physically able to carry out observer duties.
•  Successful completion of appropriate training course.
•  Meet program-specific requirements.

 

Preferred Qualifications

•  Previous experience as an observer.
•  Previous experience in scientific data collection and data entry beyond college.
•  Previous ocean experience aboard boats.
•  Valid and current passport.
 

Program-specific Requirements

For details on specific the job requirements click on the program’s  job description::

About Observing

Working as an observer is not a normal job. You could have extraordinary experiences in some of the most beautiful places on the planet. You could apply your degree and gain unparalleled field experience. And you could be a part of something big. Like the long-term health of some of the world’s largest fisheries.

But it’s not for everyone.

We want you to know what you’re getting into — and we want you to take an honest look at yourself. Do you have what it takes to persevere when the excitement wears off, when your surroundings are tough, and you’re physically exhausted?

Working conditions onboard fishing boats vary widely but are almost always strenuous. Observers often work out on an open deck and may spend hours at a time in very hot, cold or wet weather — or they may work long hours in a factory and only occasionally see the outdoors. Seasickness is common (and there’s no turning back once out at sea). Sampling and paperwork require observers to work long, odd hours, seven days a week. It is the norm to work shifts ranging from 5 to 15 hours a day, and it’s rare to sleep uninterrupted for eight hours.

Because the job objectives of the observer and the crew are different, shipboard life can be stressful. Both men and women share toilet facilities and cramped accommodations — observers typically share a bunkroom with one to six crewmembers. Vessels are rarely smoke-free.

Observers need to be resourceful about establishing a sampling station and sampling methods, diligently collect scientific samples, and be able to interact with a captain and crew whose priorities are different than yours.

Every program is different so be sure to check out the program descriptions for details and program-specific requirements.

About Observing

Working as an observer is not a normal job. You could have extraordinary experiences in some of the most beautiful places on the planet. You could apply your degree and gain unparalleled field experience. And you could be a part of something big. Like the long-term health of some of the world’s largest fisheries.

But it’s not for everyone.

We want you to know what you’re getting into — and we want you to take an honest look at yourself. Do you have what it takes to persevere when the excitement wears off, when your surroundings are tough, and you’re physically exhausted?

Working conditions onboard fishing boats vary widely but are almost always strenuous. Observers often work out on an open deck and may spend hours at a time in very hot, cold or wet weather — or they may work long hours in a factory and only occasionally see the outdoors. Seasickness is common (and there’s no turning back once out at sea). Sampling and paperwork require observers to work long, odd hours, seven days a week. It is the norm to work shifts ranging from 5 to 15 hours a day, and it’s rare to sleep uninterrupted for eight hours.

Because the job objectives of the observer and the crew are different, shipboard life can be stressful. Both men and women share toilet facilities and cramped accommodations — observers typically share a bunkroom with one to six crewmembers. Vessels are rarely smoke-free.

Observers need to be resourceful about establishing a sampling station and sampling methods, diligently collect scientific samples, and be able to interact with a captain and crew whose priorities are different than yours.

Every program is different so be sure to check out the program descriptions for details and program-specific requirements.

Saltwater Inc.  •  733 N Street, Anchorage, Alaska 99501  •  Phone (907) 276-3241  •  Toll-Free (800) 770-3241